Win your audience

It’s said that there are three secrets to giving a presentation: Tell them what you’re going to tell them, tell them, and tell them what you told them.

This approach is actually quite successful. You want to hook your audience with a taste of what’s to come before delving into the details of your message. You also want to make sure they don’t forget by summarizing what you just said at the end, in case their attention wandered during your talk – the too long, didn’t read version. Continue reading “Win your audience”

The One-Three-One approach to presentations

As we roll over the calendar into the new year, councils will be beginning their fundraising efforts for 2018. Our part as volunteers and Scouting families is participation in the Family Friends of Scouting program. Most of us are familiar with the need to help fund our Scouting programs above and beyond the direct fees that we pay, so many volunteers also choose to help support this effort by giving presentations to our packs, troops and crews inviting familiies to become Friends of Scouting.

Of course, this means giving the dreaded FOS pitch. Facing a room full of parents who just want to have dinner, watch their son receive his awards, and get on with the program, an FOS presenter gets a lot of blank, impatient stares. It seems like everyone has their hand out, and we’re trying to convince them why our hand needs to be filled. Continue reading “The One-Three-One approach to presentations”

One simple sentence

cubmastermikebaker_200You’ve probably heard that many people fear speaking in public more than almost anything else. But it doesn’t have to be that way – and as a Scouter, you are in a perfect position to learn how to ease that fear.

I had never spoken to large groups very much until I became a Cubmaster. I had given presentations at work and before my professional society, but I wasn’t completely comfortable doing it. Now, I had to entertain the boys and keep their parents informed – and you know what? It was actually fun! Scouting was something I believed in, and could see the value of in my own kids, so it became second-nature to lead the group. I put that new-found comfort to use as a trainer and was just as much at ease relating to new leaders as I was to a room full of grade-school boys.

We’re into our recruiting drives now, and you’re finding that you are speaking to groups of parents eager to hear how the Scouting program will benefit their sons. Continue reading “One simple sentence”

Put passion in your presentation

microphone_200Former president Bill Clinton has acquired the title of “Explainer-in-Chief” recently, for his talks and speeches clarifying the current administration’s actions and policies. Mr. Clinton has the ability to relate complex subjects in a manner that can speak to a large audience.

Regardless of how you may personally feel about Mr. Clinton and his messages, there is much to take away from his style of presentation. Continue reading “Put passion in your presentation”

Be a Scouting VIP

fosOur council held its annual kickoff for key donors and supporters of Friends of Scouting this week. I’m sure it was a mistake, but I was invited to attend the reception and program, held at the historic Greenfield Village. While I am an annual supporting contributor and conduct presentations for packs and troops in our area, I’m not in the same class as those who give tens of thousands of dollars or endow our council’s camps and facilities.

The message delivered by our new council president convinced me, however, that it was no mistake. Continue reading “Be a Scouting VIP”