Making Blue & Gold affordable

The season for Blue & Gold Banquets is upon us. The Blue & Gold tradition is to celebrate the birthday of Scouting in the United States. It was on February 8, 1910, that the Boy Scouts of  America was established, and the first Scout troops formed that year. Twenty years later, the younger-boy program, Cub Scouting, was instituted, and the Blue & Gold Banquet came along as a way to celebrate each year.

There are no hard and fast rules about how to plan and carry out a Blue & Gold banquet. Continue reading “Making Blue & Gold affordable”

Appreciation award ideas

As we head into another year, packs and troops will be holding Blue and Gold Banquets and Courts of Honor where we recognize our Scouts for their achievements. We should also remember to recognize our adult volunteers, because without them we wouldn’t have a Scouting program.

Recognizing Scouts is easy. The badge of rank, belt loops and pins, and merit badges are symbols of what they’ve accomplished. Recognizing adults is a bit more difficult. Continue reading “Appreciation award ideas”

Journey into 2020

The end of the year is hectic, with packs, troops and crews wrapping up their roster review, collecting membership fees and filing their recharter paperwork. It can be a big job, especially if there’s lots of turnover either with youth members leaving as well as joining. And getting those disclosure forms is causing a lot of gray hair – almost as much as trying to figure out how to pay registration fees that have doubled with funds that are most likely already collected.

Sometimes relegated to an afterthought is the Journey to Excellence scorecard. A one-page checkup on the health of your unit, JTE is a handy way to see where you’re doing well and where you might consider improving. When you sit down with your unit commissioner and go over the form, you can gain some valuable insight into how to help your unit better serve your youth. Continue reading “Journey into 2020”

Knowing isn’t doing

We frequently encounter Scouts who just don’t do what we think they should be doing, like planning the details of this weekend’s campout, or setting up their tents before nightfall. On a larger scope, we wish our Scouts would move along with advancement a little quicker, instead of dragging their feet on requirements.

Some of our adults can give us the same fits – a committee member who won’t come to a meeting with essential information, or work on a task that’s in their area of responsibility. We wish we could say something or do something that would get them moving, or stop doing something that’s causing a problem.

When these things happen, we need to look deeper for clues as to what’s going on. Continue reading “Knowing isn’t doing”